Frequently Asked Questions

Answers to questions about KTM & Husqvarna Bikes

KTM and Husqvarna dual sport bikes come with an inherent set of issues related to the fact that they are dual sport, and must pass emission standards to be deemed street legal. You don't have to live with these issues. Find answer to common questions about KTM & Husqvarna bikes here.

What's the first thing I should do to my KTM EXC-F / XCF-W ?


The best thing you can do is to just fix its weakest links to ensure you don't walk home. And that means replacing the stock fuel pump and in tank fuel filter, with our much better quality pump and filter. I fully understand, that you can't understand how such an expensive bike can have some junk parts on it, but it would be true. The stock pump is Chinese junk and quite a few have failed around the 10 - 50 mile mark. Same with the junk, cheap plastic in-tank fuel filters. They like to split and fail at any time, and again, so many have failed in the 10 - 50 mile area. And this doesn't mean if they go past 50 miles all is ok. It just shows how bad they are. Having them replaced under warranty, you are just replacing them with the same junk parts. So just make sure you don't walk home first, and then you can get into any other changes you want to make. You can get our In-Tank Fuel Filter, and Fuel Pumps Here




Do KTM’s and Husqvarna’s Really Have Emissions?


The 2012 -2020 250, 350, 450, 500 and 501's do actually have emissions or "smog" equipment, if they are the street model bikes. These are the EXC and FE-S labeled bikes. The 2012 - 2019 bikes have what's called air injection valves, carbon canisters, and fuel vapor suction systems. The air injection valves are what sucks air into the exhaust system, when you let off the throttle. This adding of air to the exhaust, is what causes the "popping" or backfiring, when you let off the gas. Disabling or removing of the air injection valve, so that excess air doesn't enter the exhaust, is what fixes the backfiring. Just adding fuel to the air/ fuel mixture, to richen up the bike, won't solve the problem, as many may have you believe. The 2020 bikes don't have an air injection valve, so there is nothing to remove or disable here. All 2012 - 2020 bikes that are EXC or FE-S models, do have fuel vapor recovery systems. This does include a small pump, normally called a solenoid valve and a carbon canister. On 2012-2016 bikes, the solenoid valve is located on the bottom of the throttle body and is attached to to it with a rubber holder and metal bracket. On these years, you can unplug and remove the solenoid, and you won't get any flashing engine codes on your odometer. On 2017-2020 bikes, the solenoid valve is located on top of the engines crankcase. If it's disconnected on these years, then an engine code will flash on the odometer. It doesn't hurt anything, but is annoying. Something called a "fuel dongle", which is just a high dollar resistor, can be put in its place to stop the engine code blinking. It's easier to just keep the solenoid plugged in and zip-tie it up in the air box, if you can't stand looking at it. You can get our In-Tank Fuel Filter and Fuel Pump Here




Is My Bike Running Lean, And Will It Cause Problems?


Answer #1 2012 - 16 EXC and FE-S bikes are really only lean from right off idle to 1/4 throttle. Even though they can benefit from a bit more fuel everywhere, it's not dangerously lean everywhere else. A 2012-16 bike has an open (unrestricted ) intake already, which means only the exhaust is restricted. So if and when you open up the exhaust flow, the bike will run leaner everywhere. Thing is, it will run at a safe air / fuel ratio still at wide open throttle, which we measured at 13.7 - 14:1 area. The biggest problem area is down around 1/8 - 1/4 throttle area, where the bike will run around 16:1 air / fuel ratio with an open exhaust. This is what gives you the jerky throttle response, the lack in acceleration, the running hot and the stalling. So adding fuel to the 2012 - 16 bikes, helps fix these issues in the lower rpm area, and makes a big difference in the way the bike runs. We have found that just adjusting the TPS or throttle position sensor, is all these years need to solve these fuel problems and run well. That's why we only sell our TPS tuner #1, for these year bikes. Answer #2 2017 - 2019 EXC and FE-S bikes. By the way, the EXC-F and EXC are the same. F just means four stroke. These bikes and settings are totally different than 2012-16 and also 2020, so their settings do not apply. People want to sell you Vortex ignitions for these years of bikes a lot. We sold them too but don't anymore. To put fuel numbers in perspective, a Vortex, wide open on the dyno with an open intake and exhaust, had an air/fuel ratio of between 13.8 and 14:1. This is a bit on the lean side for wide open but is still safe. On the 250 and 350 bikes ONLY, you can just use TPS tuning if you want and the bike will run at 13.5 air/fuel ration wide open, with the intake tract and exhaust being opened up. The TPS setting range has to be at least .70 volts out for this to happen. .70 - .78 volts out, with exactly 5.00 volts in , is the range to play in. If you want to use our fuel programmer, then the bike runs even better. On the 250 and 350, the dyno proved that the TPS tuning made as much power as the Vortex and the air / fuel was even safer. The Dyno also proved that our fuel programmer made one horsepower more than the Vortex, for about 1/4th the price. This is why we quit selling the Vortex On the 450's and 500 / 501's, the tps tuning only provides enough fuel up to 80% throttle. This is why we only sell our fuel programmer. Once again, the dyno proved that the fuel programmer we had designed, made one horsepower more than the Vortex, and the air / fuel ratio was 13:1 at wide open, which is better than the 14:1 from the vortex. Just like the 250's and 350's, this is why we felt the Vortex was a waste of money and quit selling it. Answer #3 2020 bikes are also real plugged up like 17-19 bikes, with the same plugged up exhaust and intake track. These bikes have an oxygen sensor in the exhaust pipe though, which feeds information back to the ECU. This O2 sensor ( oxygen sensor ) does not adjust the fuel for changing things on the engine, such as opening up the exhaust and intake. It does keep the engine running at a good air / fuel range over a much higher altitude span though. On the 2020 bikes, both 350's and 500 / 501's, only the fuel programmer we have works. And it works well. Wide open throttle is a perfect 12.8 air/fuel ratio and cruising around is set at 14:1. The GET brand ecu is an option on the 2020 bikes. It does make a bit more power than the fuel programmer, as it manipulates the ignition timing a bit. It also has a map switch that lets you switch to a traction control mode. It's more than 4 times the price of our fuel programmer, so it isn't for everyone. All of our fuel programming and TPS tuning components are available Here




My KTM EXC or Husqvarna FE-S seems all plugged up. Do I really need to open up the exhaust?


Yes. It's extremely plugged up and shouldn't even be put on a motorcycle. It's causing your bike to run far too hot, and also lets the manufacture program the bike very lean - just so that it passes emissions. The good news is that the restrictive part is just the End Cap of the stock muffler. The muffler itself is fine, and does not need to be changed. Only the end cap. That's why we make cost effective, free flowing end caps, that have spark arrestors in them. You don't need a full slip on muffler to get the performance exhaust, you just need one of our end caps. When you open up the exhaust and the engine flows more freely, it automatically runs leaner. So to answer the question, yes, you will need to get more fuel to the engine. You can use our fuel programmer for all 2017-2020 bikes, or our TPS tuner #3 for the 2017-19 250 and 350 bikes only. You can check out everything we have available for proper fuel to air ratio here




What's the first thing I should do to my Husqvarna FE / FE-S?


The best thing you can do is to just fix its weakest links to ensure you don't walk home. And that means replacing the stock fuel pump and in tank fuel filter, with our much better quality pump and filter. I fully understand, that you can't understand how such an expensive bike can have some junk parts on it, but it would be true. The stock pump is Chinese junk and quite a few have failed around the 10 - 50 mile mark. Same with the junk, cheap plastic in-tank fuel filters. They like to split and fail at any time, and again, so many have failed in the 10 - 50 mile area. And this doesn't mean if they go past 50 miles all is ok. It just shows how bad they are. Having them replaced under warranty, you are just replacing them with the same junk parts. So just make sure you don't walk home first, and then you can get into any other changes you want to make. You can get our In-Tank Fuel Filter, and Fuel Pumps Here





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Best Dual Sport Bikes designs performance aftermarket parts for KTM and Husqvarna brand bikes. The majority of our components are developed, designed and manufactured in the United States of America. Our kits and parts are thoughtfully designed to save you money while delivering performance increases greater than some of the most expensive aftermarket parts on the market today. 

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